When Time is Irrelevant: An Analogy of God’s Perspective

jan-kahanek-184676-unsplashWhen I was in high school, I attempted to write an adventure novel. Admittedly, it was quite cliche; the King died, and this peasant boy discovers he’s actually the prince (hidden in a foster family to preserve his life in the time of war). He doesn’t inherently want to, but for the sake of the nation, he must fight for his rightful place on the throne. I had lots of struggles and even more fun writing it, even though, honestly, it’s pretty darn bad.

However, it was this experience–of being an “author” and creating characters–that enthralled me in another analogy, one that I found in C. S. Lewis‘ book MiraclesI cannot fathom how God can care about each individual out of the millions and millions who have lived, can listen to each of our prayers, and can know my name before I was born. alessandro-cavestro-559170-unsplash.jpgDude, God has a lot on his hands. Even if I dismiss all the other people who have ever lived or ever will life, right here and right now there are more than 7 million people alive. That’s a lot of people for God to be intimately, constantly working with.

But C. S. Lewis said it like this: life is like an adventure novel with a complicated plot and many characters and with God as the author. To the characters in the novel, everything seems to happen in time, in succession, and without breaks. We wake up in the morning, go to work, keep house, interact with others, eat, and sleep with no breaks. Even if we take breaks, life is still going on.

But the author of the book doesn’t see time at all the same way. The author of the book is free to be working on a script for BethAnn and to stop, put down the pen and think. He can think for “hours” about this one sentence of BethAnn’s life. He can pause time for her and plan a great many specific details. He can decide where she’ll work, who she’ll interact with, what she’ll say three chapters from now.  For as long as he desires, he can consider his character, what she thinks and how she feels, even though the book has so many other characters. He can do that because he’s the author. She’ll never be aware of this pause in time, but the author can make it last for as long as he desires.

And the author isn’t restricted to working through the book sequentially, the way the18424132_1209085189217242_3477933893854710313_n.jpg characters are in the finished project. He is welcome to skip from the fourth chapter to chapter 22. He can move ahead or behind and life for the characters will never be changed in the published book.

Quite obviously the way time works on earth is not at all the same as the way time works for God. This is a very abstract concept, but imagining God as the Author of the book that we’re living right now helps me to start somewhere.

Friends, our God is so great, he is beyond understanding. Let us praise the God of the universe who, in ways still unknown to us, is always with each and every one of us–his dearly beloved.

8 thoughts on “When Time is Irrelevant: An Analogy of God’s Perspective

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